Improving in Isolation

Hall of Famer, Keith Tabatznik, in his article for FUNdamental SOCCER, “Coach: Improve In Isolation” wrote, “During the virus-shutdown might be the perfect time for coaches to improve their own ‘game.’  I asked others for input on the subject and Coach Tigran, Youth Development Phase Lead Coach, Barnet FC, UEFA PRO Licensed Coach, was kind enough to respond with the following…

Coaching is one of the most responsible tasks that people can have. It is fascinating area but is not an easy area. You have to remind yourself why players are in the training sessions; what they want; what they need and why you are there. Here are some of my thoughts and ideas to consider when coaching:

Get to know The Person and then The Player. Connect before you correct. Show them that you care not only with your words but also with your actions. Actions speak louder than your words; so speak less but when you speak be careful the words you use. Be aware what your body language communicates as well. Focus on the individual, what they want and what they need. Praising is important where there is a need for that; but praise the effort and not the outcome.  Read more…

New Coaches Challenge for Parents and Players:

Training conditions and Limits of Training Right Now…

At this time of year (normally, this year is the exception); our kids are out of school and playing their sports throughout the summer (both training and competition). This year has been vastly different with everyone’s lives knocked out of normalcy due to Covid-19 conditions. We, in the soccer community, understand the challenges that have occurred (up to this point) as well as the challenges of getting our lives to return to ‘normalcy’.

  As we return to that routine of normalcy; there are some things that we need to remember and adapt to the current routine. Leagues (over the last 2 weeks) have been told that Cal North is following US Soccer’s Return to Play guidelines, in accordance to CDC, State, and County Health guidelines. There are many entities that coaches need to research to getting these kids back on the field playing. Coaches need to get in touch with their League representatives to ensure with level of guidelines they need to follow with getting their teams back on the field safely.

In our District; we have several counties within our sphere of influence. Each county are at different phases of guidelines. For example; Kings County may be at a different level of guidelines as Madera County may be at currently. This poses a difficult challenge (that is COMPLETELY out of our hands Leagues and District wise) for our coaches. However; our common sense (as both coaches and parents) should kick and do what seems be in the best interest of all involved.

Coaches: find out from your Leagues representatives where the limits of these guidelines are. Ask for written copies so you can CONTINUALLY reference them during your training sessions. Parents; if your kids are showing symptoms of ‘summer colds’, allergies, and other similar symptoms that may cause for concern, please keep them home and safe away from their teammates and families. Error on the side of caution (at this particular time).

This may seem very taxing for all involved (coaches and parents), but it is what we need to follow so county officials don’t impose any further restrictions to Leagues for non-compliance. Everybody needs to do their part for us to get through this challenge sooner and safer for all.

One last thing coaches: NO county is at a level of guidelines that would return your team to competition level (scrimmages or games). They are still at individual with distancing training levels. Please do not have those kids scrimmaging and playing too soon. You never know who is watching and reporting to your county officials about potential risks.

Please be Safe and have FUN.

From the District-7 Office

I sincerely hope that this finds our District-7 Soccer family safe and ready to get back to the game for the kids. 

This has been a trying time for all and regretfully many of our events had to be cancelled or postponed i.e. Spring League, Cups, and Tournaments; including our CYSA Awards night where we were going to honor Coach of the Year  Skip Moss and our District Youth Referees of the Year Hannah Beaumont and Luke Perry.  We are looking forward to being able to do that next year.   

Coach of the Year

Skip Moss

 REFEREE of the YEAR                                                    REFEREE of the YEAR

 Hannah Beaumont                                              Luke Berry       

Like many of you, I have been doing some cleaning out while at home and have found loads of old soccer pins and have brought them here to giveaway.  Feel free to come by and help yourself to any in the bowl. There are some really nice ones from all over! 

As a reminder the D-7 office hours are M W Th. F 8:30-12:30.  We are closed on Tuesdays but I do come in 7 a.m. – 9 a.m. 

 I have really missed seeing everyone. In closing, as we return to the game we love – Please put the safety and well-being of our players first, and may all practices/games end with a smile on every players face………………….FUN!

Linda SoRelle

D-7 Administrative Assistant

Players and Parents

Summer is here and it’s a great chance to spend more time outdoors with family! Now for all the parents of young soccer players, what are some easy tips for enjoying playing with your kids? Even better question is how do we get our kids to enjoying setting up their own games???

Well this month we made use of FUNdamental Soccer’s tip on teaching children to set up their own 1v1 soccer games. It’s important for kids to realize that they don’t need adults to setup game play for them and here’s how it’s done using anything, anywhere, and anytime! Check out this month’s video here: Playing the 1v1 Game at Home 

You’ll see our young player setup the goals for the game.

We used water bottles, what else do your young players have lying around that can be turned into goal posts? In this game of 1v1 where there are different skill levels you can see how challenges can be created for both players. As the adult we can help make the game enjoyable for the younger players for approaching them slower, extending the leg to steal the ball slow enough so they can see the attack and decide how to move the ball, etc. Once we get the ball we can try a skill of our own, as street soccer players we have some complex combos that are not dependent on our opponents, only our ability to execute them! Then it’s their turn again and we can challenge them accordingly. And as you can see in the video, everyone gets to enjoy the game!

We hope you enjoy the video and we’ll see you next month!

Happy summer,

Coach Louie and the SISM team

Referee

When Does an Official’s Jurisdiction Begin and End?

Officials cannot enforce competition rules until a match officially starts.  However, legal and administrative needs extend beyond what the rulebook mentions regarding when an official’s jurisdiction begins and ends.

For example, the responsibility of checking the field, the game ball and each player’s equipment takes place before a match and before an official’s jurisdiction officially begins.  Failure to do those acts can lead to legal liabilities.

Similarly, the end of an official’s jurisdiction may not coincide with the sound of the final whistle. Because of this gap, there is a possibility that an official may have the jurisdiction to make calls and impose sanctions after a match has ended and those could ultimately change the result of the match.

Officials who are unaware of the extent and limitations of their jurisdiction when they accept an assignment are potentially creating legal and administrative issues for themselves.

Officials who are threatened, followed to the officials’ quarters, or the parking lot, can address players and coaches misconduct and dispense appropriate sanctions and penalties.  Having jurisdiction after the final whistle provides the officials with valuable benefits and may also deter negative acts from those who are not able to control their emotions.

Officials must be fully aware when their jurisdiction begins and ends.  They must also know the extent and limits of the jurisdiction they are provided prior to and following a contest.

Legal and administrative complications may surface when officials are unaware of what they can or are allowed to do during the extended jurisdiction or they overstep the boundaries of the jurisdiction guidelines.

We Are Playing or Are We ?

That is a question I cannot answer right now; but we have to plan to play. If we plan to play I believe we will.  But right now safety of all is so important.

We can control our own environment by following the best guidelines and policies offered. If we do not social distance then we will prolong this standoff.

The phases of practice are important read up and follow them; both US Soccer, US Youth Soccer and State Associations are sending out best practice guidelines. While the State, County and City are making policy.

What phase are we in? Do you know? If you don’t call your City and County and find out!  Then ask to be on a contact list if things change.

For example last week “bars opened” but Sunday they were told to close in 8 counties in CA. These rapid changes are to be expected in our sport and other sports. So keep informed, educate your players, parents and coaches.

If we all stay vigilant we will get through this situation, remember the safety of our kids is most important.

Stay Safe and Well,

John M Hodgson

D7 Commissioner

Positive attitudes…..

That’s what we need right now. Unfortunately with the latest comment from State of California, due to the spike in the number of cases, that can be a challenge.  But, we have to believe soccer will be played in the fall.

The playing program is submitting to District 7’s Board a suggestion of possible play dates for Fall League, with an alternative if return to play is delayed later than we hope.  Obviously anything we do will be in accordance with State legislation and County and Cities’ legislation.

In order for teams to be formed District 7 is relying on coaches and leagues to be advertising, to get kids signed up.  Registrars need to be finding Covid-compliant ways of handling registration.

Another potential issue we could have to playing, either in house or at district level, is where to play.

Let’s hope lots of safe playing fields become available in the school districts and cities’ parks.  At this time it may mean Leagues have to work harder at finding these safe locations.

Anyway please all stay safe, follow the rules of State, County/City for practices and keep positive that D7 soccer will be back as soon as it can be!!!

Lessons To Apply Post-Pandemic!

As Confucius says, “Do not worry that no one knows you; seek to be worth knowing “In other words, until you have done everything in your power to influence a situation, quit whining and start doing.

Be coach-able: Be a great listener, pay attention, and do what the coach tells you, even when you see others doing the opposite and being rewarded for it

If you are going to do something, Do It Right: Make a commitment and fulfill it. Do more than is asked, not simply the bare minimum required for participation. You can go fishing, go to that party, and go skiing when your commitment is done, but until then you owe it to your teammates to be all in.

Be honest: When someone asks your opinion, tell the truth. It is not always easy, and it is not always fun, but one day you will have a reputation as a person who others can go to when they need a hard, honest truth, not just someone who makes you feel better. The former is a true friend, and the other is just a fan. Be a friend.

Shake hands, look people in the eye, and say “thank you:” This demonstrates respect to coaches, officials and other people who have taken the time and effort to make your game, and your sport, possible.

Be patient: Being really good at anything is a marathon. Some people may grow before you, and thus be bigger, faster and taller than you, but so what? That will all eventually even out, and then what? Will you be a better player, or someone who gave up because life didn’t hand you all the breaks right away?

Embrace both failure and success: You want to do your best to win, but what matters more than the scoreboard is how you learned and developed. Don’t ignore mistakes because you won, and don’t dwell on them because you lost. Everyone makes mistakes, so you might as well make them trying to make a play, instead of trying not to make mistakes.

Don’t slouch and pout: Your body language and your attitude matter. They affect how coaches, teammates and others perceive you, and if you are going to be a leader, no one really cares how you are feeling right now. Suck it up and be positive.

Don’t hold a grudge: My dad coached high school soccer in various capacities for 17 years, and then was unceremoniously fired one season after a couple of parental complaints. I say unceremoniously because most years he donated his coaching salary to the school scholarship fund to help needy athletes. He bought equipment when the school had no budget. He ran extra training in the off season at no charge to players or families. It broke his heart when he was let go, and yet the next year he once again donated to the school scholarship fund. I asked him why. “They do a lot of good for so many kids,” he said. “It’s not those kids fault, and they should not be the ones who suffer.”

Be humble: Whether you win or lose, be humble. It’s just a game, and today was your day. Tomorrow might be theirs. Respect the officials, coaches, and your opponents, because chances are you will see them again someday beyond the sports field, and what you do on it will affect how they think of you.

John O’Sullivan, author.  This excerpt was taken from his blog… https://changingthegameproject.com/life-lessons-old-school-sports-dad/

ONE TEAM

Dan Saferstein, Ph.D. has continued his resilience blog for these pandemic times. He asked me to once again share with people reading Komments.

He plans to add a few posts each week. He also looks forward to hearing from you and getting through these pandemic challenges together!

Click on the following links to read his newest blogs:

Greatness & Goodness              Indulgence             Trust           And More Blogs

Peace & Love,

Dr. Dan   

What’s Your Motto?

Chris Stewart:

My team motto (and my personal life motto) is “Try hard. Do your best. Have fun.

I talk about these three basic points ALL THE TIME. I find that by reinforcing them each and every touch (text, email, phone call, practice, game) that I lead my entire team family (not just players but parents, even grandparents) to understand that this team is about way more than winning or losing, trophies or awards. It is about life.

And life has winners and losers. Life is not fair. Fair is a fantasy. And losing is a wonderful teacher.  “Success has a thousand mothers, and failure is an orphan.” By keeping it at this level, everyone buys in. Leave the fleeting external motivators out of it.

Foster the internal. That is where it needs to come from anyway if a player is going to achieve his or her potential.

Koach Karl:

Currently:  The Outcome of Our Children’s Health…Is Infinitely More Important Than the Outcome of any Game/Practice We Will Need to Cancel!”

 Lifetime: The Outcome of our Children…Is Infinitely More Important Than the Outcome of any Game They Will Ever Play! 

DO YOU HAVE A MOTTO?  Please Send it to: koachkarl@fundamentalsoccer.com

For future publication

New Coaches Challenge for Parents and Players:

Training conditions and Limits of Training Right Now…

At this time of year (normally, this year is the exception); our kids are out of school and playing their sports throughout the summer (both training and competition). This year has been vastly different with everyone’s lives knocked out of normalcy due to Covid-19 conditions. We, in the soccer community, understand the challenges that have occurred (up to this point) as well as the challenges of getting our lives to return to ‘normalcy’.

As we return to that routine of normalcy; there are some thing that need to remember and adapt to the current routine. Leagues (over the last 2 weeks) have been told that Cal North is following US Soccer’s Return to Play guidelines, in accordance to CDC, State, and County Health guidelines. There are many entities that coaches need to research to getting these kids back on the field playing. Coaches need to get in touch with their League representatives to ensure with level of guidelines they need to follow with getting their teams back on the field safely.

In our District; we have several counties within our sphere of influence. Each county are at different phases of guidelines. For example; Kings County may be at a different level of guidelines as Madera County may be at currently. This poses a difficult challenge (that is COMPLETELY out of our hands Leagues and District wise) for our coaches. However; our common sense (as both coaches and parents) should kick and do what seems be in the best interest of all involved.

Coaches: find out from your Leagues representatives where the limits of these guidelines are. Ask for written copies so you can CONTINUALLY reference them during your training sessions. Parents: if your kids are showing symptoms of ‘summer colds’, allergies, and other similar symptoms that may cause for concern, please keep them home and safe away from their teammates and families. Error on the side of caution (at this particular time).

This may seem very taxing for all involved (coaches and parents), but it is what we need to follow so county officials don’t impose any further restrictions to Leagues for non-compliance. Everybody needs to do their part for us to get through this challenge sooner and safer for all.

One last thing coaches; NO county is at a level of guidelines that would return your team to competition level (scrimmages or games). They are still at individual with distancing training levels. Please do not have those kids scrimmaging and playing too soon. You never know who is watching and reporting to your county officials about potential risks.

Please be Safe and have FUN.